Last edited by Daikora
Thursday, January 30, 2020 | History

7 edition of Pliny found in the catalog.

Pliny

Natural History, Volume II, Books 3-7 (Loeb Classical Library No. 352)

by Pliny the Younger

  • 356 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Loeb Classical Library .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Other prose: classical, early & medieval,
  • Natural history,
  • Literature - Classics / Criticism,
  • Ancient, Classical & Medieval,
  • Folklore & Mythology,
  • Pre-Linnean works

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsH. Rackham (Translator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages672
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7694148M
    ISBN 100674993888
    ISBN 109780674993884

    He had apportioned the wine in small decanters of three different kinds, not in order to give his guests their choice but so that they might not refuse. Moreover, the address I am talking about is a fighting speech and full of contentious matter, and Nature has so ordained it that we think, if a subject has given us trouble to write, it will give an audience trouble to listen to it. What they were you know. Regulus thought I bore him malice for this, and so he did not invite me when he read his pamphlet. The procuratorship of Hispania Tarraconensis was next.

    Subscribe today The private letters are carefully written, occasional letters on diverse topics. This he has done and will continue to do in the most friendly way, without regard for his age and his due retirement. I should have had to look carefully and long, had it not been that Minucius Acilianus was ready to hand, - one might almost say that Providence had prepared him for the purpose. Towards the conclusion of his speech he added the remark that the senate considered that, since Tacitus and myself, who had been summoned to plead for the provincials, had fulfilled our duties with diligence and fearlessness, we had acted in a manner worthy of the commission entrusted to us.

    A little farther back, on the left-hand side, is a spacious chamber; then a smaller one which admits the rising sun by one window and by another enjoys his last lingering rays as he sets, and this room also commands a view of the sea that lies beneath it, at a longer but more secure distance. You see whom you ought to follow, and in whose footsteps you should tread. You acted with your usual prudence, Sir, in instructing that eminent man, Calpurnius Macerto send a legionary centurion to Byzantium. The village, which is separated only by one residence from my own, supplies my modest wants; it boasts of three public baths, which are a great convenience, when you do not feel inclined to heat your own bath at home, if you arrive unexpectedly or wish to save time. The text has some structure. The sea does not indeed abound with fish of any value, but it yields excellent soles and prawns.


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Pliny book

Along its side stretches a covered portico, almost long enough for a public building. Each holds an item of recent social, literary, political, or domestic news, or sometimes an account of an earlier but contemporary historical event, or else initiates moral discussion of a problem.

It was not as one master to another, nor as one pupil to another, that you sent me your book - though you Pliny book it was the latter - but it was as a master to his pupil, for you are the master and I am the pupil, and whereas you summon me back to school, I am for extending the holidays.

Dismiss the inquiry, therefore, which I should not admit even if there were precedents to support it, and let Cocceianus Dion be required to submit the plan of the whole building he has raised under your supervision, as public interests demand that he should.

He is said to have dictated extracts while taking a bath. In the middle of the wall is a neat recess, which by means of glazed windows and curtains can either be thrown into the adjoining room or be cut off from it.

It now rests with you to recompense me for both these epistles with the very fullest letter that can be sent from where you are staying.

What makes me doubtful is rather the subject-matter than the actual composition. Not content with that, he makes his way in to see Spurinnaand begs and prays of him - you know what an abject coward he is when he is frightened - as follows. The question arises, therefore, whether a man who held office before he was thirty can be admitted by the censors to the senate, and, if he can, whether by the same interpretation those who have not held office may also be appointed senators when they reach the age at which they may become magistrates.

I must publish something, and I only hope that the best thing for the purpose may be this volume which is ready finished. Colossal head of Titusson of Vespasian. Those who boast of their own good deeds are credited not so much with boasting for having done them, but with having done them in order to be able to boast of them.

The letters thus allow us a glimpse of the personalities of both Pliny and Trajan. This statement would have pleased Tacitus.

Pliny the Younger

You will laugh, and I give you leave to. The dates of different parts must be determined, if they can, by philological analysis the post mortem of the scholars.

Pliny's helmsman advised turning back, to which Pliny replied, " Fortune favours the brave ; steer to where Pomponianus is. There are not many of them, though you doubtless wish there were. The letters he writes are so good as to make you think the Muses speak Latin.

When composition of the Natural History began is unknown.A translation of Pliny's Letters, Book 2. Pliny the Younger: Letters - BOOK 2. Translated by sylvaindez.com () - a few words and phrases have been modified.

See key to translations for an explanation of the format. Click on the L symbols to go the Latin text of each letter. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

Pliny the Younger : Letters

Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Pliny book Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Full text of "Pliny. Jan 02,  · Pliny the Elder, Roman savant and author of the celebrated Natural History, an encyclopedic work of uneven accuracy that was an authority on scientific matters up to the Middle Ages. The work, which was largely complete by 77 CE, is divided into 37 books and covers such subjects as botany, zoology, and astronomy.

book ix. the natural history of fishes. book x. the natural history of birds. book xi. the various kinds of insects. book xii. the natural history of trees book xiii. the natural history of exotic trees, and an account of unguents.

book xiv. the natural history of the fruit trees. book xv. the natural history of the fruit-trees. book. administered antaphrodisiac applied topically arrests astringent axle-grease beaten berries betony blossom boiled Book bowels branches bruised centaury CHAP cinquefoil colour cough cubit curative cure cyathi of wine decoction denarius Desfontaines diminutive Dioscorides dittany The Natural History of Pliny, Volume 5 Bohn's classical library.

PLINY'S CAREER IN GOVERNMENT Book 7, Letter 33 Pliny wants Tacitus to record an incident from his career in the Senate. During the reign of Domitian, Pliny and his colleague, Senecio, had to prosecute the governor of Baetica, who was a friend of the emperor's. When the governor tried to intimidate Sencecio, Pliny jumped to his defence.

Book 8.